Results – 12/06/17

These are the words written when I think today.  It is June. The sun is not out, but it is warm.  My feet ache from walking, though I have not walked far.  Tapping and lawnmowers is what I hear.  A droning.  A moaning.  A systematic approach to thinking.  Being displeased with the current situation of sitting, and rising up to attention.  To flow, I allow my fingers to move, not my brain.  My brain moves too slow, or so quick it appears slow.  Like the earth spinning.  Like clouds moving.  Cumulonimbus.  Full of rain and dampness.  An uncomfortable setting of clothes.  It creates an itch, completely scratch-able yet completely avoidable.

Is Jeremy Corbyn a fashion icon?  Is the culture he presents strong or weak?  My answers to both these questions is no.  My answer to most questions surrounding the labour party leader is no.  The answer to most things in general is no.  Yes is not a complex enough answer.  Yes appears perfect and absolute.  No requires explanation.  Explain yourself, said American serial TV detective to the unassuming suspect.  They never explain themselves.  It was a victory for the left, the 2017 snap general election.  It was victory for the Owen Jones and the indie twitter goons.  I celebrated this victory heartedly and for once felt content with political views.  Frustration had fled away from me, and hope replaced it.  Laughter is the key, and at the centre of it all.  Laughter at Theresa May, and the failings of the uninformed.  The blindness of the ignorant must be mocked, and not shunned.  Mocked to the point of obscenity would be my preference in the future.

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The plan is to continue to be amused by the current political climate.  An amusement at the red versus blue, and the desperate colours in between.  A more pragmatic attitude would be welcome in me.  Where would I find it from?  Coffee or adderall?  Patience is a nice word to use.  Patience for a film to inspire me or a politician to anger me.  My anger stems from those who follow, not those perpetuate.  At this time it seems as though no-one is following Jared Kushner, except for perhaps his father-in-law.  I can’t wait to hear him speak.  His voice must be of an odd nature, or a crude one.  It must whine or croak for it to have been hidden for so long.  I picture a United Kingdom with a strange coalition.  At the top sits Corbyn, alongside Nicola Sturgeon and Tim Farron.  They are on a peculiar mound inside the houses of parliament and Farron is lighting up a joint whilst tweaking a newly fitted reverend band.  Kushner enters, before a state visit from the American president.  He delivers a statement and the coalition laugh at his voice.  An echoing laugh and the speaker calls order.  From then, they begin to tease him on the President’s policies of coal mines, an industry worth about 1% in workforce and effort.  Kushner cries, then goes home, only to realise that James Comey has in fact eaten the whole Trump family.

Edgar Wrights new film Baby Driver is in cinemas soon and it is just making me want to un-follow Wright on twitter.  There must be a limit on the amount of posters created for a singular film, and the amount of times a director can self promote.  At least the film is something to look forward to, away from this sea of current boring cinema.  Wonder Woman as a concept and a film falls right into that, and whatever anyone says, it’s still a superhero movie.  Thankfully, my mind hasn’t been on writing about film and has been fixated on the election.  That is not going to change anytime too, thanks to a literal non-existent government.  A non-existent government that may soon be a Tory slash 1980’s right wing collaboration.  The notion of reverse Northern Irish devolution is both terrifying and hilarious.  Also a possible chance we can fight terror with terror, thanks to a return of an IRA movement.

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Passing judgment or thoughts on the recent terror attacks is hopeless and I have just about given up fighting for any sort of flagship position.  Being passive is the way forward, and muting tweets is my new favourite hobby.  My timeline (without creating my own echo chamber) is slowly being catered to less nonsense and stupidity.  I’m not blocking out varying views, but stuff I can live without, like a tweet a minute about Rhianna.  I’m not even sure I’ve spelled her name right.  Either way, I can’t run away from the horrors of the world, and I’m still very much in the camp that the world’s demise is incoming.  However there is much to be excited about, such as the cricket, a sport in which I’m happy to say England are quite good at.  For now.

 

Frustration Leading into the General Election

Passing opinion is incredibly dangerous.  You could be ill-informed, inexperienced and ignorant.  I’m all of those things, and so giving my opinion is like stabbing myself in the eye.  Or the brain.  Political opinion is even tougher, because it requires context and history, something that is hard to gauge at a first glance.   When the snap General Election was announced, I wrote this short story thing.  The point of it was basically an attempt to stay away from caring about the vote, and to refrain from passing comment on it.  Yet here I am, with that post deleted, writing about how I am already frustrated by it all.  I think I get more on edge about these things than most people, and scrolling through twitter for most of my day doesn’t help.  Every tweet about the upcoming election makes me want to run head first at a wall.

Politics as a trend is something that you see all over twitter. It is cool to be on the left and have somewhat socialist values.  This is because on the surface, those values seem the most genuine and caring.  It also has something to do with virtue signalling, as coming across as compassionate certainly leads to slightly more popularity.  Twitter is a game of circles and to be a part of your desired circles, you have to lean to the right (not right) side politically.  This is all very boring, and seriously annoying.  I see countless tweets every day that are immensely pro-labour and anti Tory.  Hating tories as a joke is funny and it’s a joke I make fifty times a day, but some of the outlandish things written about them via ‘cool’ or dare I say it ‘indie’ twitter is sickening.  How can anything be achieved, how can any of the corrupt political system be broken down when a whole side of people blankets the Conservatives as ‘poor people haters’.

The Fox hunting debate could be the most bizarre argument of it all.  It is literally a conflict between an elite group who want to barbarically hunt an animal, and everyone else who for some strange reason don’t like it.  The tories sit in-between desperate for funding from those elites and to be able to keep whispering in their ears.  It’s strange that people are so adamantly against it (I mean the general public, not actual animal rights campaigners), because it’s such blatant fake morality.  Fox hunting is no more evil than buying a Coca Cola product or using an Apple phone, yet where’s the tweets about them. The left sits in this position of being as hopelessly dumb as the right, because of whining about a minority hobby that comparatively is just as evil as everything else in the world. Ignorance is a given in all of culture and politically I’m pretty sure it has always been a trend amongst my demographic.  I just don’t want people going into a blind vote, whoever they are voting for.  The cynical side of me wants those clueless votes going into Labour, and in time I hope that the party don’t let us down.  At this point, I can’t see them winning, they’re being far too nice for that.  All the party needs a little but of ruthlessness to get into power, and then mould the socialist values around them once they’re in.

On the 8th of June, I will be voting Labour for mostly logistical reasons.  Logistical in a sense that right now a majority Conservative government means no leeway with policy. Even if Labour don’t win, we need more seats in there so that we can balance the delegation of power.  With Labour, we will hopefully have more security with Europe, and a possible super soft Brexit.  It also means a change in leadership, and a massive one.  For the first time, possibly ever, we will have someone in charge who actually cares.  Jeremy Corbyn, a man there for all the right reasons.  I can never get my head around the dislike towards him because sure he’s a plonker, but a plonker who is naturally geared towards helping people.  You can’t say the same about Theresa May, who is the epitome of the walking-talking panderer.

To explore this deeper, there must be a look at the rise of this weird Marxist regime from American university campus’.  The idea of communism and far left rituals being useful is certainly in the zeitgeist.  What I obtain from it, is the impending doom of mankind, and a definite feeling that civilisation won’t last another century.  I mean this is a big step from being frustrated by UK election twitter, but it always sidelines my thoughts on anything. It gives me this ‘whats the point’ overview.  It’s why I get angry at people getting angry, or agitated by those passing judgement whilst being intolerant themselves, because it all doesn’t matter.

Side-note: This is partly inspired by twitter and partly inspired by the Joe Rogan Experience.  I think I’m probably going to delete this post soon because I can’tquite articulate what I’m trying to say.  Perhaps I should go back to being mute and focus on more important things, like watching Alien 3 in the middle of the day.

Discovering a Dislike for a Newspaper

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And then realising you hate all of them would be an apt continuation of the title for this piece.  Though considering I haven’t read every word of every paper ever written, I’m probably not qualified to say that I dislike them all.  But I do dislike the Sunday Express. I’m not entirely sure what possessed me to buy the 25th of September 2016 edition, other than I needed a crime article for one of my lectures.  Thankfully, there was an article on the the front page that I could skim through, so I took it over to the counter.  Can’t even tell you how much it was.

Arriving home, I read the story I needed to, then decided to have a gander at the rest of the paper.  It wasn’t an enjoyable experience.  The inside page spread was a large piece on the recent labour leader election.  Now I’m a Jeremy Corbyn fan, so I’m slightly blinded, but they were talking about him like he was a prolific murderer.  They couldn’t believe he’d won a majority again and are preparing for another downfall.  Now this whole thing about how the media creates a false persona of Corbyn is described well by the fake news reporter guy whose videos make the rounds of Facebook.  Watch that if you come across it, rather than me discuss it, because I really don’t care enough.  All I have to say is that it amazes me this two page article got past the editor.

The rest of the paper consisted of some generic news stuff, that was fine to read, and some awful tabloid stuff.  It also included a full sport pullout, where every page was populated by football apart from one that was actually quite an interesting look at the upcoming Ryder Cup and it’s relation to Brexit.  That was the highlight.  The trouble I have is that I don’t who the demographic for this paper is?  It’s certainly not me and I’m baffled that it’s still in publish.  I’d be interested to meet the kind of people that read this stuff.

 

Sidenote: This is all exaggerated and I can’t work out the point of it.  It’s just I’ve had a distaste for the newspaper business and it’s been clogging my mind.